ChatGPT & Education

Learn how to leverage the power of ChatGPT, a cutting-edge AI chatbot, to enhance the education experience for students. From improving essay writing to facilitating various learning tasks, discover the various ways in which ChatGPT can benefit your students.

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ChatGPT & Education

Learn how to leverage the power of ChatGPT, a cutting-edge AI chatbot, to enhance the education experience for students. From improving essay writing to facilitating various learning tasks, discover the various ways in which ChatGPT can benefit your students.

education, programming, AI, machine learning, ChatGPT

ChatGPT &

Education

Designed by Torrey Trust, Ph.D.

College of Education

University of Massachusetts Amherst

@torreytrust | [email protected]

This work is licensed under CC BY NC 4.0, meaning that you can freely use, remix, and share it as long as you give attribution and do not use it for commercial purposes.

NOTE: This slide deck is a work in progress and will continue to be updated as new ChatGPT resources, research, and ideas are published.

Table of Contents

What is ChatGPT?

What do you need to know about ChatGPT?

Privacy

Trustworthiness

ChatGPT makes stuff up!

Free labor

What can ChatGPT do?

What can ChatGPT NOT do? (yet)

What can Educators do?

Additional Resources

What is ChatGPT?

An artificial intelligence (AI) tool that uses natural language processing techniques to respond to user-generated prompts.

Put simply: You ask ChatGPT a question or provide a prompt, it replies using natural language.

Screenshot of ChatGPT prompt and response.

What is ChatGPT?

Can you tell the difference between text written by a fourth grader and text written by ChatGPT?

Try out the New York Times quiz “Did a Fourth Grader Write This? Or the New Chatbot?”

NOTE: This article might be behind a paywall. UMass Amherst students, staff, and faculty have free access to the New York Times.

What is ChatGPT?

Can you tell the difference between text written by a college student and text written by ChatGPT?

What do You Need to Know about ChatGPT?

OpenAI (the company that designed ChatGPT) collects a lot of data from ChatGPT users.

The privacy policy states that this data can be shared with third-party vendors, law enforcement, affiliates, and other users.

This tool should not be used by children under 13 (data collection from children under 13 violates the United States’ Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule - COPPA).

The Terms of Use (End-User License Agreement) state that “you must be 18 years or older and able to form a binding contract with OpenAI to use the Services” (OpenAI, 2022, para. 2). This means that students under 18 years old should not be asked to sign up to use the tool.

While you can request to have your ChatGPT account deleted, the prompts that you input into ChatGPT cannot be deleted. If you, or your students, were to ask ChatGPT about sensitive or controversial topics, this data cannot be removed.

TIP: Before asking your students to use ChatGPT (if you plan to do so), please read over the privacy policy and terms of use with them and allow them to opt out if they do not feel comfortable having their data collected and shared as outlined in the policies.

What do You Need to Know about ChatGPT?

What do You Need to Know about ChatGPT?

ChatGPT is not always trustworthy.

ChatGPT was trained using a massive dataset of text written by humans that was pulled from the Internet.

Thus, the responses can reflect the biases of the humans who wrote the text used in the training dataset.

ChatGPT is not connected to the Internet and the data used to train it was collected prior to 2021.

According to the FAQs, ChatGPT “has limited knowledge of world and events after 2021 and may also occasionally produce harmful instructions or biased content” (Natalie, para. 4).

Screenshot of ChatGPT FAQ page.

What do You Need to Know about ChatGPT?

ChatGPT makes stuff up!

To make up for knowledge gaps (e.g., lack of training data to pull information from), ChatGPT will provide a response to the best of its ability (often made up) rather than say “error” or “cannot compute.”

See “How to Talk to ChatGPT, the Uncanny New AI-Fueled Chatbot That Makes a Lot of Stuff Up” (Ropek, 2022).

EXAMPLE: ChatGPT provided the APA reference list below for a prompt about professional learning networks (PLNs). The first and last citations are NOT real articles (they do not exist!). The middle two are real articles (but not actually related to PLNs).

What do You Need to Know about ChatGPT?

Asking students to use ChatGPT provides free labor to OpenAI.

ChatGPT is in its infancy. It will continue to become a more intelligent form of artificial intelligence…with the help of users who provide feedback to the responses it generates.

Do you really want to ask your students to help train an AI tool as part of their education?

Make sure to read: ChatGPT and Good Intentions in Higher Ed by Autumm Caines.

Screenshot of ChatGPT FAQ page.

What do You Need to Know about ChatGPT?

Screenshot of ChatGPT interface from a mobile phone

You cannot delete your prior prompts/questions!

OpenAI is attempting to mitigate potential harms (i.e., what the people who trained the tool consider to be harmful). Read this Vice article to learn more.

See Did ChatGPT Just Lie to Me? & Information Literacy and Generating Fake Citations and Abstracts With ChatGPT

ChatGPT is not connected to the Internet. If asked about events after 2021, it may tell you it cannot respond or it may make up an answer!

ChatGPT is in the “free research preview” stage. Meaning that your use of the tool is helping improve it…for free.

See example table on “Teaching Students to Write with AI: The SPACE Framework.”

What do You Need to Know about ChatGPT?

ChatGPT is often at capacity, meaning that you cannot always rely on having it available if you use it for teaching and/or learning.

OpenAI appears to be launching a pricing plan for unrestricted use of the tool, but no official announcement has been made yet.

What can ChatGPT do?

Write essays.

Explore this list of Sample AI-Generated Essays by Anna Mills (CC BY NC 4.0).

What can ChatGPT do?

Write poems in the style of a specific author.

What can ChatGPT do?

Write lesson plans.

What can ChatGPT do?

Design an outline for a class syllabus.

What can ChatGPT do?

Write policies for a class syllabus.

What can ChatGPT do?

Write learning objectives.

What can ChatGPT do?

Design quiz/test questions.

What can ChatGPT do?

Write a script for a podcast or video.

What can ChatGPT do?

Design a rubric.

What can ChatGPT do?

Provide directions for a learning activity.

What can ChatGPT do?

Write emails to students.

TIP: Do NOT provide a student’s full name and associated class grade to ChatGPT to write emails, this is a potential FERPA violation (in the United States) for sharing a student’s educational record (with OpenAI) without their permission.

What can ChatGPT do?

Take notes on text that you insert into ChatGPT (e.g., a video/podcast transcript)

NOTE: There seems to be a limit on how much text you can insert into the ChatGPT text box (it was not able to read the full Sir Ken Robinson TED talk transcript).

What can ChatGPT do?

Provide a revised version of text with improved grammar and spelling.

What can ChatGPT do?

Write a text for students to read that is designed for a specific lexile level and includes specific vocabulary.

What can ChatGPT do?

Write choose-your-own-adventure stories.

What else can ChatGPT do?

Design (and attempt to solve) math and science problems.

Role play class scenarios.

Identify potential misconceptions students might have about the content.

Remix student work.

Provide low-quality and high-quality writing examples.

Give students feedback on their writing.

Provide tips on how to personalize/differentiate learning.

Generate discussion prompts for class.

Provide one-on-one tutoring or coaching.

Write letters to parents (K-12 teachers) or students.

*These ideas and more from this Twitter thread by Robert Petitto, this Twitter thread by Matt Miller, Ditch That Textbook, and 5 Ways ChatGPT can help Primary Teachers by Marc Hayes.

Also, check out A Teacher's Prompt Guide to ChatGPT aligned with 'What Works Best'.

What can ChatGPT NOT do? (Yet)

Write a self-reflection (e.g., “describe how the content we covered in class last week shifted your thinking about your role as a current/future teacher”).

Write about anything that happened after 2021.

Provide non-text based responses (e.g., “design an infographic, interactive Google map, TikTok-style video, meme, multimodal timeline”).

Note: ChatGPT can still help with writing a script for a podcast or video or crafting the text to go in an infographic, meme, poster, timeline, etc…

What can ChatGPT NOT do? (Yet)

Make predictions about future events.

Browse or summarize content from the Internet.

Draw connections between class content and visual materials.

What can Educators Do?

Before you panic and consider banning technology from your classroom in favor of handwritten essays and oral exams (not that there’s anything wrong with those methods, but they might lead to more student anxiety and be more challenging for disabled students)…consider how this tool might help you rethink teaching and learning.

Instead, you might…

Update your syllabus.

Check out the Sentient Syllabus Project for potential language you might use in your syllabus about ChatGPT.

Read Update Your Course Syllabus for chatGPT.

Talk with students about academic integrity.

Students often gloss over the boilerplate “academic integrity” statement in a syllabus. Update it to include AI tools. Update it to be more student-centered (see Zinn 2021 template). Bring it up in class. Talk about why academic integrity is essential to students (Hint: Don’t just focus on extrinsic motivators like their grades).

Check out the Classroom Policies for AI Generative Tools document. (Lance Eaton)

What can Educators Do?

Redesign your assignments.

Try assigning multimodal, higher-order thinking and learning activities (see creative activity examples), challenge-based learning, Shark Tank in the classroom, experiential learning, makerspaces, revising and designing new Wikipedia pages (see Teach with Wikipedia), addressing wicked problems, and other assignments that cannot be completed by ChatGPT or other AI tools.

Encourage risk-taking, productive struggle, and learning from failure.

Students can learn more from failure than success (Ofgang, 2021), but far too often, when students fail, they are not given

ChatGPT & Education
Info
Tags Education, Programming, AI, Machine learning, ChatGPT
Type Google Slide
Published 26/01/2023, 04:34:59

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